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Does Profit Trump the Truth? The 1st Amendment in the 21st Century

sign that reads First Amendment Permit Area
Lesson Plan Author(s): 
Mason Golding and Jake McBee
Topic: 
Can media be both a commodity and a public service?
Teaching Area: 
Social Studies
Standards: 
American Government, Standard 8
Grade Level: 
11th and 12th Grades
Teaching Level: 
Secondary Childhood
Origins Item(s): 

This lesson plan focuses on the news and media in America today and the idea of freedom of speech. The Origins article deals with how the media has responded to the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump. The article analyzed the media’s heavy focus on the Trump campaign compared to the rest of the candidates (Trump received an estimated 2 billion in free media coverage and far more than his opponents). We decided to use this article because it deals with the issues of the First Amendment, freedom of speech, and how they relate to the responsibility of the news media. The article also traces the history of the news and how ratings and revenue became their primary objectives instead of simply reporting information. After reading the article for homework, students will begin class by participating in a Quick Write answering what they think is the most important part of the First Amendment. After watching the video on news sensationalism, they will participate in the interactive Nearpod lecture. The lecture will provide students will questions and polls to participate in from their own devices. After analyzing the article and issues through the Nearpod lecture, students will be prompted to choose sides in the “On the Fence” activity. Students will pick sides based on the statement “Should the media be regulated or does the First Amendment provide them the freedom to say and do what they want?” Students will debate the issue using evidence from the article to try to convince other students to join their side. To close the lesson, students will participate in a 3-minute essay to express their thoughts and what they have learned.

Instructional Strategies:

Quick Write: (Quick Write)
On the Fence Activity (On the Fence?)
3-Minute Essay (3-minute essay)

Lesson Materials:

Nearpod Presentation/Polls

Key Words: 
First Amendment, media, Trump

Twitter Cold War

Putin and Trump meeting
Lesson Plan Author(s): 
Eugene Nash
Topic: 
Did the collapse of the Soviet Union mark the end of the Cold War?
Teaching Area: 
Social Studies
Standards: 
ONLS (Contemporary World Issues) 1; ONLS (American History) 27
Grade Level: 
10th Grade
Teaching Level: 
Secondary Childhood
Origins Item(s): 

This lesson plan deals with the continued strained relationship between NATO and Russia. It uses the Origins article “The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the USSR brought an end to the Cold War,” which directly challenges the Ohio American History standard, “The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the USSR brought an end to the Cold War”. The article asserts that the Cold War never really ended and is in fact becoming more heated.

This lesson is designed for a classroom with technology, but modifications are included for classrooms with limited or no technology.

The lesson begins by first contrasting the Cold War and actual combat by likening these two concepts to terms more familiar to students such as a fist fight and twitter war. Students will be grouped as Russians, NATO, and judges. In each group there will be an author, a least two researchers, and someone to search for visual representations. The students can talk within their groups but can only communicate silently via twitter to the other groups. The groups representing Russia and NATO will make creative twitter handles that reflect themselves. The judges will decide who has the best handle and that team will be awarded bonus points.

The Russian and NATO groups will be debating via a “Twitter War” over a controversial statement that the instructor will give them. Students responses must be 160 characters or less and they can use hashtags and pictures. The judges will evaluate the debate based on the use of evidence and the strength of each argument. Within the first ten minutes of the “twitter war”, the judges will post one question each within the first ten minutes. Each group will have to immediately respond. To conclude the lesson, the instructor will post the EQ in which the Russians, NATO, and the judges will all have to answer. Once all responses are posted, the class will close class by discussing the EQ.

Instructional Strategies:
 
Lesson Materials:
Key Words: 
Communism, Geopolitical, Cold War

Representations of Women in Politics in Modern Media

Hillary Clinton
Lesson Plan Author(s): 
Ellie Hessler & Jessica Reynolds
Topic: 
How are women in politics represented in the media?
Teaching Area: 
Social Studies
Standards: 
Standard 19; ONLS 8.19; CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.2
Grade Level: 
8th Grade
Teaching Level: 
Middle Childhood
Origins Item(s): 

This lesson plan deals with the representation of women in the media, specifically looking at how women are represented in current American politics. The Origins article that we selected dealt with representations of women in politics through various media formats over time. The article compared representations of women who have been major political figures before Hillary Clinton. This article highlights the accomplishments of female political leaders and then discusses the powerful roles that women play in television shows. It raises the question: Why are women only represented as presidents in television shows and not in reality? Our lesson plan does not include a portion for the students to read the article themselves, but the article inspired the activities in our lesson plan. For instance, our opening word association activity was inspired by the article because of the way it discusses the representation of women in the media. After the word association activity, students work in groups to analyze an image, either a political cartoon or ad, and respond to guiding questions that support their analysis of the image. The purpose of this activity is for students to analyze and understand the affects that the media, images, and messages can have on citizens. Students must determine who the intended audience of the image is, what message the image is trying to send about women in politics, whether the image is projecting a positive or negative perspective on the candidate, and whether or not the image is effective in persuading public opinion. Students work together to answer these questions in groups and then each group shares their ideas during the whole class discussion. At the end of class, students will respond to two questions on an exit ticket that asks them to assess how the media can influence citizens’ opinions and how this might affect decision making.

Instructional Strategies:

Small Group Work: Image Analysis

Whole Class Discussion 

Lesson Materials:

Key Words: 
Media, Women, Influence

Sensationalism, Modern Media, & Presidential Elections

Lesson Plan Author(s): 
Jill Hetki & Allison Irvin
Topic: 
What drives media?
Teaching Area: 
Social Studies
Standards: 
CCSS.8.19; Writing Standard 8.7
Grade Level: 
8th Grade
Teaching Level: 
Middle Childhood
Origins Item(s): 

 

This lesson plan allows students to examine the role the media has in shaping public opinion in relationship to how the media portrayed Trump throughout the 2016 presidential election. The Origins article we used to inform our lesson plan was about how media coverage shaped the 2016 presidential election and how the goals of the media are creating revenue and ratings. During the lesson, students would not be reading the article. Instead, the article was used as a resource for teachers to gain information on the history of media for the lecture segment of instruction. For the opening of the lesson, students will write down their thoughts on logos featuring Native Americans and then watch a video and explain how media changed their opinions. After this, there is an interactive lecture with discussion about the goals of media and the history of media shaping public opinion. After this, students will do a quick write where they relate the goals of media to the 2016 presidential election. The next activity allows students to work in groups to compare and contrast media from today to media of the past. As a class, the teacher and students will have a discussion questioning the accuracy of media through a political cartoon. Finally, students will complete an exit ticket based on a scenario regarding what the media chooses to cover using information they learned throughout the class period.

Instructional Strategies:

Lecture

Group Work

Class Discussion

Lesson Materials:

Key Words: 
Media, Presidential elections, public opinion, propaganda

The FARC: A Road to Rebellion

FARC
Lesson Plan Author(s): 
Trevor Barhorst & Jeff Tiedeken
Topic: 
How do political choices lead to conflict?
Teaching Area: 
History
Standards: 
Standard 8.22 & Literacy 6-8.2
Grade Level: 
8
Teaching Level: 
Middle Childhood
Origins Item(s): 

This lesson plan serves to help students understand the formation of the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia-People’s Army) in Colombia. The Origins article that inspired this lesson plan discusses how this guerrilla group spawned from a nation suffering from long-term political violence and failed peace treaties.

Given the history of FARC, students will be asked to create a timeline listing all the important events discussed in the article. This timeline will be used as a talking piece to discuss why conflicts arose in Colombia, how the government handled those conflicts, and the results of those actions. This will lead into a broader discussion on how various countries have resolved their own internal conflicts, whether it be through a government action, an uprising, war, popular vote, protest, etc.

From this discussion, students will be tasked with the challenge of devising an intervention the Colombian government could have taken in the 1960’s just after the establishment of FARC. Students will support their intervention plan using evidence from the Origins article or from the previous discussions. Students will propose their intervention plans to the class and those plans will be defended/modified based on their peers’ critiques.

Lastly, students are given an Exit Ticket which gives students a chance to individually reflect on the various intervention plans and select one plan the Colombian government should have taken in the 1960’s. Students will support their selection using information from the Origins article and the previous discussions.

Instructional Strategies:
 
This lesson plan takes advantage of these Instructional Strategies described by www.washoeschools.net
 
1. Academic vocabulary and language -1 
2. Cooperative Learning-7
3. Cues, questions, activating prior knowledge-8
4. Document Based Questions-13
5. Formative Assessment-17
6. Graphic Organizers -19
7. Additionally, student will be doing a Think, Pair, Share described here.
 
Lesson Materials:
Key Words: 
Columbia, FARC, Peace
(00:37:18)

In this episode of History Talk, hosts Brenna Miller and Jessica Blissit speak with three experts on North Korea: Deborah Solomon, Mitchell Lerner, and Youngbae Hwang. Westerners tend to think of North Korea as an isolated "Hermit Kingdom" led by crazy dictators, but what is the view from inside Pyongyang? Join us as we discuss when and how North Korea got its nickname, debate its accuracy, and find out what's shaping North Korea's decisions. 

                - Posted December 2016    


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