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"Heat Map"
"Heat Map"

Recreated from a snapshot of the NSA's own map, this one shows how much surveillance each country was subjected to, ranging from dark green (least) through yellow to orange and finally, red (most). 

"Stop Watching US"
"Stop Watching US"

American citizens protest domestic spying at an October 2013 rally in Washington, D.C. Photo by Slowking.

"You Should Use Both"
"You Should Use Both"

In this PowerPoint slide leaked to the Washington Post by Snowden, NSA agents are urged to both collect data en route to its destination and harvest it wholesale from providers whose logos are arranged at the top of the slide. 

A. Mitchell Palmer
A. Mitchell Palmer

Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer created the Radical Division of the Bureau of Investigation in 1919 to root out domestic subversive activity. 

Charles Bonaparte
Charles Bonaparte

President Theodore Roosevelt had selected Charles Bonaparte, his attorney general, to set up an agency for domestic surveillance, but Congress rejected the idea.

Edward Snowden
Edward Snowden

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden

Frank Church
Frank Church

Frank Church chaired the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, or Church Committee, which scrutinzed domestic surveillance activities and revealed many of the shadier operations of the FBI, CIA, and NSA.

Fred Hampton
Fred Hampton

Fred Hampton, a young and charismatic Black Panther, was shot in bed by the Chicago Police Department. A COINTELPRO informant had infiltrated his organization and may have assisted in the police raid that took Hampton's life.

J. Edgar Hoover
J. Edgar Hoover

Hoover was selected at 24 years old to lead the Radical Division of the Bureau of Investigation. He served the intelligence agency for the rest of his life, including 37 years as director of the FBI. 

Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

The CIA infiltrated the civil rights movement. Martin Luther King, Jr., might be the only major American political figure spied on by both the CIA and Russia's intelligence agency, the KGB.

McKinley Assassination
McKinley Assassination

This drawing shows anarchist Leon Czolgosz shooting President William McKinley in 1901, prompting some to advocate keeping political dissidents under surveillance. 

National Security Agency
National Security Agency

The NSA logo features an eagle and a key.

NSA '85
NSA '85

The National Security Operations Center of the National Security Administration looked like this in 1985. Around that time, the agency was classifying 100 million reports annually.

Pinkertons
Pinkertons

In this 1884 newspaper illustration, Pinkerton detectives accompany strikebreakers to work.

Protesting the Vietnam War
Protesting the Vietnam War

The CIA infiltrated the antiwar movement in the 1960s. Here protesters hold a sit-in at an entrance to the Pentagon in October 1967.

Richard Helms and Richard Nixon
Richard Helms and Richard Nixon

Richard Helms, director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1966 to 1973, is photographed here with President Richard Nixon. Nixon would fire Helms for refusing to help cover up the Watergate scandal.

William Sullivan
William Sullivan

Sullivan, a highly decorated veteran of World Wars I and II, helped J. Edgar Hoover launch COINTELPRO.